Play Time

It seems to me that whenever you think of children’s playrooms, the bright primary hues of Fisher Price come to mind. But really, why is that necessary? I’m not saying our children should be turned on to my favorite color- black- at the bright[1] young age of 3 but I don’t think playrooms today have to be as loud as their predecessors. When you think about what’s in a playroom,[2] you have a lot to work with already in terms of color and texture. I think keeping wall colors muted[3] allows for a calming environment amidst the inherent chaos of a room of play.

Containers are also a magnificent way to keep the room organized post-clean-up. Having a space for each item teaches kids organization and responsibility for their own space. In the Reggio Emilia approach to learning,[4] keeping everything within reaching distance allows the child to choose his or her activity, thus allowing their own skills to develop and flourish and lets them have a sense of control over their fun and education. Having the toys within reaching distance again teaches them that everything has a place. Another really great tool from the Reggio Emilia method is creating spaces within spaces: quartering off various parts of the room designates that a single space is for a specific activity.[5] For example, the art studio should be functional and separate from Barbie’s dream house. I tell ya, the skills for organization just keep adding up.

Even if you don’t adhere to the Reggio approach, these are individually great tips to keep your kids playroom fun, educational[6] and kid-friendly.

organize
more adult
organ
dress up
keep it
keep it muted
ok
organixe
uber irly
pastel
teepee
chalk wall

[1] And still hopeful.

[2] Barbies, hot wheels, stuffed animals.

[3] Which does not necessarily mean beige.

[4] Which applies mostly in schools but can be implemented at home.

[5] Nooks and crannies are ALWAYS fun for kids anyway. Adults too.

[6] Sorta.

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